Tag Archive | "Noah: The Movie"

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There were Giants on Noah’s Ark?

Posted on 27 February 2013 by michaeljensen

As already has been widely reported, Darren Aronofksy‘s movie Noah is going to include a race of giants as part of the story. In case you’re a heathen like myself and suspect he’s trying to rip off The Hobbit by adding said giants, rest assured he’s not. There are giants in the bible, even if they aren’t jolly and green. And why shouldn’t there be something as exotic as giants in the Good Book? There are 900-year-old men and burning bushes that don’t turn to ash while angels talk out of them. You know, fairy tales like the Brother Grimm.

The biblical giants are called the Nephilim and while not everyone agrees on the details, they are mentioned in both the Hebrew and Christian bibles, mostly as angels (possibly fallen) who came to earth, mated with women, and created a super race.

Nephilim fallen angels

Nephilim

Funny, I never heard about that in bible study. Frankly, it sounds like the plot of a bad James Bond movie.

To make the Nephilim even more interesting, in Jewish folklore there was one giant who actually made it on board Noah’s Ark where he lived in a special compartment built just for him. Or he possibly sat on top of the ark because that isn’t anymore ludicrous than a boat with two of every creature in the world on it.

In Aronofsky’s movie version, the giant angels, who are eighteen feet tall and have six-arms, are called “Watchers” and are pretty important to the storyline. The two main ones are  are Og (Kevin Durand), an angel who helps Noah and his family, and Samyaza (Mark Margolis) who is considerably less enamored of humanity.

I don’t want to spoil too much about the Watchers, but no sane director would put giants in their movie and then not do some pretty cool CGI stuff them. Noah shouldn’t disappoint on that score.

 

 

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Russell Crowe Dressed as Noah

Posted on 11 January 2013 by michaeljensen

russell-crowe-noah-set-beardWhile we still haven’t seen a lot of photos from the set of Darren Aronofsky‘s Noah, the DailyMail did score a number of shots of Russell Crowe in costume as Noah. The beard is certainly biblical and the clothes rustic and simple as befits the supposed era of the movie. And Crowe certainly looks the part of a biblical patriarch.

What do you think of Noah’s look?

ussell-crowe-noah-4

Russell Crowe Noah

russell-crowe-noah-1

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Is “Noah” Villain Named Tubal-cain or Akkad?

Posted on 11 January 2013 by michaeljensen

Ray Winstone as Akkad/Tubal-cain

Ray Winstone as Akkad/Tubal-cain

Is Noah‘s nemesis in Darren Aronofsky‘s upcoming Noah named Tubal-cain or Akkad? The answer isn’t entirely clear.

When Ray Winstone was first cast in Noah his character’s name was widely reported as Tubal-cain. Wikipedia still shows that as being the case, however, IMDb.com doesn’t list any name for the character. Subsequent news reports reflect the confusion.

A synopsis for the film quoted in several articles about the movie describes a villainous character named Akkad. What about the actual script? The version I read also shows the name of the character as Akkad, but that could’ve changed anytime before shooting started.

Hopefully Aronofsky or someone else from the movie will clarify the matter soon.

While the name of Winstone’s character isn’t of the utmost importance there are some interesting facts about both names.

As it so happens, Tubal-cain is an actual figure from the Bible and even the most heathenish of us should be able to guess who Tubal-cain is descended from. Yep, Cain, as in the first human to commit murder. It would appear Tubal-cain is one apple who didn’t fall far from the tree. And Tubal-cain is also Naameh’s brother, making him Noah’s brother-in-law.

As for the name Akkad, it holds historical significance as it was the capitol of the Akkadian empire in 3000 BC.

Whether the character’s name is Tubal-cain or Akkad, he is still a wicked king who dismisses Noah’s warnings of an impending flood, but when Noah turns out to have been on to something, Akkad tries to take the Ark by force. I won’t spoil whether he succeeds or not, but I will say that attacking the Ark isn’t the only way he tries to thwart Noah.

 

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It’s Snakes on an Ark! Noah’s Ark!

Posted on 10 January 2013 by michaeljensen

Thus far there haven’t been many pictures released from the set of Darren Aronofsky’s Noah, but cinematographer Matthew Libatique tweeted out this picture of the interior of the ark. Specifically, what must be the herpetology section of the boat as the pic is filled with what looks like thousands and thousands of snakes. (And one alligator that must not be very hungry or is very full.) The floor of the boat is glowing mysteriously and what that is combined with all of the snakes, I find myself thinking Indiana Jones and the Raiders of the Lost Ark.

Snakes inside Noah's Ark

The snakes on board Noah’s Ark

This answers the question of whether Aronofsky’s Noah is really planning on bringing two of every creature, though doing so would be utterly impossible, short of some ridiculous pretzel-twisting of logic some biblical “scholars” engage in.

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Is “Noah” a Post-Apocalyptic Movie?

Posted on 10 January 2013 by michaeljensen

In October 2012, Emma Watson commented on the setting of Noah: “I think what Darren’s [Aronofsky] going for is a sense that it could be set in any time. It could be set sort of like a thousand years in the future or a thousand years in the past. [...] You shouldn’t be able to place it too much.”

Others have suggested based on the script and some of the images released thus far that the movie (and the graphic novel written before the movie filmed) has a post-apocalyptic feel as opposed to a more traditional biblical feel. Here is an excerpt from the synposis:

His name is Noah. Far from the stereotype of the patriarch that one appends the character of the Bible, he looked like a warrior. He looks like a Mad Max out of the depths of time. In the world of Noah, pity has no place. He lives with his wife and three children in a land barren and hostile, in the grip of severe drought. A world marked by violence and barbarism, delivered to the savagery of the clans that draw their reason to survive from war and cruelty.

Mad Max? Sounds pretty post-apocalyptic to me!

Having read the script I think the movie has strong elements of both. Noah definitely has the feel of a ravaged world that is the setting of so many current post-apocalyptic projects. People are barely eking a living out of a bleak landscape ruined by mankind and the characters are certainly dressed in drab earth tones and simple fabrics while carrying crude looking weapons.

Shot from the set of "Noah"

Shot from the set of “Noah”

That being said, the movie does include plenty of elements from the Bible including Noah getting messages from God, fallen angels, and miracles. That being said, I suspect many religious folks are going to have issues with how “faithful”

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Who Else Was Up for the Part of Noah?

Posted on 10 January 2013 by michaeljensen

Christian Bale Michael Fassbender Noah

Christian Bale and Michael Fassbender could’ve been Noah

While Russell Crowe might seem like an obvious choice to play the biblical patriarch Noah, the Aussie actor wasn’t director Darren Aronofsky’s first choice. That was actually Christian Bale (The Dark Night Rises) who passed on the role. Aronofsky then turned to Michael Fassbender, hot off the success in X-Men: First Class and Shame. While there is no report of Fassbender officially passing on the role, his name stopped appearing in articles about the movie.

Perhaps part of the reason Crowe came on board is due to the fact that the Noah script, originally written by Aronofsky, was subsequently rewritten by John Logan, who happens to be the writer of Gladiator, which also happens to be the movie for which Crowe earned an Oscar for Best Actor. Perhaps Crowe thinks Logan has written another Oscar-worthy script.

The part of Noah wasn’t the only role nearly played by someone else. Before Aronofsky settled on Ray Winstone to play Noah’s nemesis Tubal-cain he reportedly considered Val Kilmer, Liam Neeson, and Liev Schreiber.  But Aronofsky decided that none of those three had the physical size or grit to go up against Crowe. While it’s hard to argue that’s true of Kilmer and Schreiber, it’s a harder case to make with Neeson. The guy played Aslan for crying out loud!

Additionally, Julianne Moore (A Single Man) was considered for the part of Naameh which went to Jennifer Connelly (A Beautiful Mind), and Dakota Fanning (War of the Worlds) was set to play Ila before she had to drop out due to scheduling conflicts. Emma Watson (Harry Potter) was then cast as Noah’s adopted daughter.

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Darren Aronofsky Intrigued by Noah Since Age 13

Posted on 10 January 2013 by michaeljensen

Darren Aronofsky discussing "Noah"

Darren Aronofsky discussing “Noah”

Director Darren Aronofsky is no slouch when it comes to making movies with grand themes that go dark places. His first movie Pi was about a mentally unstable math genius while Requiem for a Dream took viewers deep into the world of drug addiction. So it’s no surprise that Noah, Aronofsky’s latest project, takes on one of most famous stories of all time – the legend of Noah’s Ark and the biblical flood supposedly sent by the Christian god to punish mankind.

What is surprising, however, is that Aronofsky has been fixated on the biblical figure of Noah since he was thirteen-years-old and wrote an award-winning poem about the end of the world as seen from Noah’s point-of-view. Aronofsky told The Guardian that his story wouldn’t be the usual biblical epic:

 “Noah was the first person to plant vineyards and drink wine and get drunk,” he says admiringly. “It’s there in the Bible – it was one of the first things he did when he reached land. There was some real survivor’s guilt going on there. He’s a dark, complicated character.”

In 2008, Aronofsky told SlashFilm.com why he thought any studio would be crazy to not want to make the movie:

“It’s the end of the world and it’s the second most famous ship after the Titanic. So I’m not sure why any studio won’t want to make it,” said Aronofsky. “I think it’s really timely because it’s about environmental apocalypse which is the biggest theme, for me, right now for what’s going on on this planet. So I think it’s got these big, big themes that connect with us. Noah was the first environmentalist. He’s a really interesting character. Hopefully they’ll let me make it.”

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Russell Crowe as Noah

Posted on 10 January 2013 by michaeljensen

Russell Crowe Noah in "Noah"

Russell Crowe stars as Noah in Darren Aronofsky’s “Noah”

The 48-year-old New Zealand born Aussie actor stars as Noah, the 900-year-old biblical patriarch who receives divine visions of the end of the world. Crowe, an Oscar winner for Gladiator, was actually Darren Aronofsky’s third choice to play Noah, after Christian Bale and Michael Fassbender. Both men declined the part.

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Emma Watson as Ila

Posted on 10 January 2013 by michaeljensen

Emma Watson

Emma Watson plays Ila

Like her Harry Potter co-star Daniel Radcliffe, twenty-two-year old Emma Watson seems keen on proving she’s more than just another Hogwart’s graduate. In Noah, Watson takes on the part of Ila, Noah’s adopted daughter. It’s also reported that Ila has a close relationship with Noah’s son Shem. Dakota Fanning was originally cast, but had to drop out due to scheduling conflicts.

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Darren Aronofsky, Director of “Noah”

Posted on 10 January 2013 by michaeljensen

darren-aronofsky-noahTruly one of the most visionary directors of the past fifteen years with a body of work that includes groundbreaking films such as Pi, Requiem for a Dream, The Fountain, The Wrestler, and Black Swan, which was nominated for five Oscars. Aronofsky says the story of Noah captured his imagination from a very young age.

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